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One of the most anticipated albums of 2021 has been released and Billie Eilish has delivered a winner.

Author of the article:

Stuart Derdeyn

Publication date:

August 12, 202142 minutes agoRead for 5 minutes Join the conversation Billie Eilish attends the “Happier Than Ever: The Destination” celebration presented by Billie Eilish and Spotify for the new album in Los Angeles, California on July 29, 2021. Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer /Getty Images for Spotify

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Billie Eilish

Happier than ever | Interscope records

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genre: introspective pop

Key track: my future

One of the most anticipated releases of the year is here and fans can’t get enough of Billie Eilish’s Happier Than Ever.

Rolled out in a series of videos – many of them conceived and staged by the multi-talented singer / songwriter – for songs like the creepy NDA, the female empowering Lost Cause or the cool classic, the title track, the follow-up to the breakout debut When We All Fall Asleep, Where To let’s go? proves that Eilish is not a one-hit wonder. She and her collaborator / brother Finneas have really advanced on the 16x track record, which is as honest an exploration of the roller coaster ride of instant fame as it is to throw convention on the faces of critics.

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After enduring endless obscene bodyshaming as the teenage cover story, the now 19-year-old takes on the wit, intelligence, and kind of creative expansion that drives these guys insane.

It is clear that this is a musician who operates on her own terms and the results obviously cannot be the same as last time. It’s not the next big thing anymore.

But the new record makes it clear that it has everything you need to keep fans and newcomers busy with their material. Here are five things you should know about the album.

1: Getting older. I’m getting older / I think I’m aging well. Tackling the youth obsessed pop culture consumers who find they are “usually deranged,” Eilish purrs over a sparse keyboard loop and some Beatles-esque harmonies. She is blessed with one of the best quiet, breathy performances in pop music today and uses it again and again to give effect to her dreamy songs. When she makes it clear that “Things I once enjoyed / now keep me busy,” then it is appropriately blunted without being tearful.

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2: Billie Bossa Nova. From Montreal’s great COTS to reggaeton stars, the mellow sounds of Brazilian bossa nova have been popping up all over the landscape lately. Obviously, Eilish and Finneas chose to dress this song up in a way that they’re considering breaking up an admirer with mechanical percussion blips, an almost cheesy keyboard solo, and – obviously – sexy acoustic guitar. They know this will be a concert favorite as online live versions make it clear.

3: oxytocin. The first hit on Happier Than Ever is a hypnotic, singing dance track that could easily become a hit with industrial goths anywhere. The song is less about celebrating one of Hollywood’s most beloved addictions and more about disturbing obsessions with people that should make smart people work. Classic creepy Billie.

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4: Not my responsibility. A literal refutation of all these bodily harming trolls that a short film contains is powerful. Should I be smaller / weaker / taller? the singer asks of the legions who seem to believe they have some right or reason to attack a high school student who may or may not want to wear comfortable clothes. Not only does she sound wild, but she has a clear idea of ​​where all these idiots can go.

5: Male Fantasy. By the time the listener gets to the last song, you know that Eilish has entered the world where dates NDAs sign that it’s not their responsibility to find a place for the critics and that everyone dies. She sounds resigned to the challenges of healing a broken heart in public and drops a really beautiful voice on this delicate melody. In a way, it’s a very life-affirming note to unsubscribe from.

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Charles Spearin

My city of starlings | Art and sculptures

genre: Post-rock

Key track: Rutting season

On its first release under its own name since 2009, The Happiness Project, Broken Social Scene / Do Make Say Think member Spearin presents a collection of new tunes that were created around a “Song-a-Day” recording club, the he and his global colleagues all participated during the pandemic. The opening track Portrait Of An Artist As A Thursday landed with a 12 hour video loop by animator Jared Sales and set a pretty good standard for the rest of the recording. It ranges from the mutated dub of Rutting Season to the vocal loops of Three Voices (Braided Carefully) with Robin Dann and the psychedelic spins of the title track.

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fleece

Breathtaking and cruel | www.fleecemusic.com

genre: Indie dream pop

Key track: Why can’t we be alone?

Montreal-based queer quartet Fleece drives their orchestral indie pop with the soaring lead vocals of Matt Rogers and the jazzy drums of co-founder Ethan Soil. These two were the core of the band during their three albums, although Stunning and Atrocious round out the group with regular membership. That gives the 14-song album a cohesive feeling of being a band work and the product of like-minded players making music that suits all of their interests. That can mean a rocker like Like It A Lot for the delicate, country-colored bodies Lie. With the Motown ballad redux from Why Can’t We Be Alone, they achieve a feeling of seductive perfection.

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jungle

Love in stereo | Caiola / Piccadilly Records

genre: Funk / Pop

Key track: Keep moving

As a supplier of super-funky, disco-heavy pop songs that get stuck in your head, Jungle catapults out of the pandemic summer with the hymn Keep Moving. A bubbly boogie down number with big string choruses and big bass over nasal vocals that could have appeared on a Bee Gees album is just one of many great grooves that the British crew captured in stereo on Loving . The production is easily ridiculous in its razor-sharp complexity. Just check out how perfectly each sound is separated on Romeo ft. Bass or the Acid Jazz of Fire. A definite party plate.

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Pachyman

The return of Pachyman | ATO records

genre: Reggae

Key track:

OK, does anyone know where Pachyman went. Or how long? Not that it matters.

It is important that Puerto Rico’s “one-man dub band” Pachy Garcia is familiar with mutated instrumental pieces in the Mad Professor or Scientist style and that his ATO Records debut is loaded with many of them. The fact that this album sounds like it should have come from Jamaica or Brixton in the late seventies doesn’t change his joy. Nothing goes as well with hot summer weather as melodica and reverberant bass instrumental excursions with a healthy helping of weird sounds that arise when you turn one knob or the other while mixing. Classic island sounds.

sderdeyn@postmedia.com

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